1. 20:41 31st Aug 2014

    Notes: 130

    Reblogged from taifunu

    image: Download

    lightcolours:

Mediterranean Nights

    lightcolours:

    Mediterranean Nights

     
  2. 07:00

    Notes: 1672

    Reblogged from architectureofdoom

    architectureofdoom:

Dom Bosco Sanctuary, Brasilia, Carlos Alberto Naves, 1963.
Stained glass by Hubert Van Doorne. View this on the map

    architectureofdoom:

    Dom Bosco Sanctuary, Brasilia, Carlos Alberto Naves, 1963.

    Stained glass by Hubert Van Doorne. View this on the map

    (Source: theotheralice)

     
  3. 06:30

    Notes: 52

    Reblogged from danskjavlarna

    image: Download

    danskjavlarna:

The spirit of peace sits atop a cannon, from Punch, 1862.

    danskjavlarna:

    The spirit of peace sits atop a cannon, from Punch, 1862.

     
  4. 06:30 30th Aug 2014

    Notes: 122

    Reblogged from laclefdescoeurs

    image: Download

    blastedheath:

Charles Johann Palmié (German, 1863-1911), View of Zschopau, 1910. Oil on canvas, 83.5 x 73.5 cm.

    blastedheath:

    Charles Johann Palmié (German, 1863-1911), View of Zschopau, 1910. Oil on canvas, 83.5 x 73.5 cm.

     
  5. 07:08 29th Aug 2014

    Notes: 146

    Reblogged from crisdehaine

    chimneyfish:

Vertigo, 1908
Leon Spilliaert

    chimneyfish:

    Vertigo, 1908

    Leon Spilliaert

     
  6. 07:00 27th Aug 2014

    Notes: 70

    Reblogged from alexanderguns

    image: Download

    blastedheath:

Hernan Bas (American, b. 1978), Untitled (Knit Sweater), 2002. Water-based oil on mylar, 11 3/4 x 9 in.

    blastedheath:

    Hernan Bas (American, b. 1978), Untitled (Knit Sweater), 2002. Water-based oil on mylar, 11 3/4 x 9 in.

     
  7. 06:30

    Notes: 175

    Reblogged from baffomet

    image: Download

    animus-inviolabilis:

Charon’s Barque
Auguste Rodin
c. 1880

    animus-inviolabilis:

    Charon’s Barque

    Auguste Rodin

    c. 1880

     
  8. 06:43 26th Aug 2014

    Notes: 390

    Reblogged from separatioleprosorum

    image: Download

    fleurdulys:

The Chalice of Becoming - Odilon Redon
1894

    fleurdulys:

    The Chalice of Becoming - Odilon Redon

    1894

     
  9. 06:43

    Notes: 86

    Reblogged from separatioleprosorum

    image: Download

    chimneyfish:

Des Esseintes, 1888
Odilon Redon

    chimneyfish:

    Des Esseintes, 1888

    Odilon Redon

     
  10. 10:19 24th Aug 2014

    Notes: 294

    Reblogged from separatioleprosorum

    image: Download

    amare-habeo:

Guillaume Vogels (Belgian, 1836 - 1896)
Fog (Brouillard), N/D

    amare-habeo:

    Guillaume Vogels (Belgian, 1836 - 1896)

    Fog (Brouillard), N/D

     
  11. 09:36

    Notes: 179

    Reblogged from fleurdulys

    image: Download

    fleurdulys:

De Leie - Albert Baertsoen

    fleurdulys:

    De Leie - Albert Baertsoen

     
  12. 06:30

    Notes: 151

    Reblogged from millionsmillions

    I don’t start with disorder; I start with the tradition. If you’re not trained in the tradition, then deconstruction means nothing.
     
  13. …the insidious cultural tendency of students to think of themselves as customers…

    Steve Almond

    People keep saying this, but it won’t change the simple fact that students are customers.  (And their teachers, by the way, are employees.)  Perhaps the more insidious cultural problem is the ubiquitous dissimulation of market relations as non-market relations.  For instance, Mr. Almond goes on to refer to my favorite term, “literary citizenship”—what is this but the salesman’s cant moralized?: “Subscribe to my magazine or else you’re a bad citizen!”  

    Much of what Almond discusses in his essay is true enough—our culture is rotten with a cheap, carping, spectatorial negativity.  We’ve forgotten that the spectator’s genuinely broader perspective—furnished by the contingency of distance—comes at the high cost of not acting, not creating.  Or rather, we haven’t forgotten it, but tried to repress it, and the resentful whine in our tone is the evidence of our guilty conscience: we piss and moan out of powerlessness, corralled in our media pens, and we know it.  I was an early adopter of this mode: you should have seen my blog in 2005, it was a pre-Twitter festival of unremitting outrage toward this or that.  And then I realized that not only was such a mode useless—worse than useless, in fact, because it was a stealth mode of advertising for what I supposedly thought pernicious, as all censorious discourse ultimately is—it was a waste of energy that could be put into creation of work I judged beautiful, interesting, and insightful.  Because making such work would put me into action, I would lose the spectator’s privilege of absolute judgment, but the rewards (the inner rewards, I mean) would be greater, and they have been.*

    But…college students—including those in non-funded MFA programs—are still customers, quite literally.   None of the foregoing changes that.  As a teacher, I handle this ineluctable fact in the following ways: 1. I transparently explain how what I teach will be useful and necessary to them; 2. I try to teach material of broad necessity and usefulness, scorning the tendency to use the courses I am assigned as mere platforms for my own niche interests (yes, professors, we may be aged and weary of Plato, Shakespeare, and Toni Morrison, but there are 18-year-olds who have not read them yet!); 3. I try to avoid making excessive and unnecessary moral judgments (“entitled!”) on students who, if their behavior is impolite, have simply not yet been taught any better.  When my students are wrong, I tell them—nothing in the exchange of services for money prevents that.  They may not accept my judgment, but that was the bargain made when we went from feudalism to capitalism.  Marx and Engels, after all, praised capitalism extravagantly in the beginning of the Manifesto, precisely because it put an end to the cultural coercions of power relations disguised as ethical relations (i.e., master and man as one happy family).  


    Art is a different matter, in that—unlike education, which may be formalized—it is always an ethical relation between the artist and the world.  I believe that art must be shielded from the hasty judgments of the market, at least for a time, usually by the mediation of public or private institutions willing to pay artists for “whatever,” trusting that the “whatever” will eventually prove itself valuable in ways not immediately visible to the money people. To that extent, art must be protected from its customers insofar as they have a consumer mentality.  This is because, among other things, mystery is essential to art, the unfathomable is the core of it, transparency is fatal to it.  Art, therefore, is anti-capitalist (also anti-socialist, as socialism too is the quantification of the spirit). Education’s rigors lie elsewhere, and while I won’t say there’s no mystery involved in it, the elements of contract, which have no place in literature itself because literature does not deal in fixed quantities, can be respected if one only makes the effort on either side.  


    * I’m not for a minute coming out against negative reviews; I write them myself—all the time!  I’m against ambient negativity, atmospheric sarcasm, a cultural tone in which nothing serious can be discussed.  Negative critical judgments are important and essential, as long as they are made with reference to and in service of higher values.    

     
  14. 10:46 22nd Aug 2014

    Notes: 834

    Reblogged from batvalentinworld

    I said to my soul, be still, and wait without hope
    For hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love,
    For love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith
    But the faith and the love and the hope are all in the waiting.
    Wait without thought, for you are not ready for thought:
    So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.
    T.S. Eliot, “East Coker” (via liquidnight)
     
  15. 07:30

    Notes: 92

    Reblogged from enchantedsleeper

    image: Download

    enchantedsleeper:

Autumn Fantasy, Émile-Auguste Pinchart

    enchantedsleeper:

    Autumn Fantasy, Émile-Auguste Pinchart